Rick Santorum: The "Right" Candidate for a Theocratic America

CatWhisperer's picture

One has to wonder if the Republican Party has been infiltrated by Obama supporters. Because if this field of candidates is the best they can come up with, then all you can do is shake your head, and Obama is guaranteed another four years in office.

I had a talk with an old friend of mine today. Her parents are conservative bible-belt Republicans. They are actually thinking of voting Democrat for the first time in their lives. As many of you may have noticed, the Obama camp has been fairly quiet, have they not? LOL, they can be quite as a mouse on Christmas Eve, and the Republican candidates will win the election for the Obama camp at this stage. So, I have to ask: 8 votes… Really? That's just so Bushesque.

But the scariest candidate is Rick Santorum. He would be a great candidate if there was a Taliban Party in America, from the following quoted story from Reuters. This is an example of a leading candidate, of that which is the culmination of the Party of Lincoln? You've got to be kidding, right, is all I can ask.

Quoted Story: Santorum sees “harm” to children with same-sex parents
Author: Ros Krasny
Quote:

A Rick Santorum town hall meeting in New Hampshire turned heated on Thursday when the conservative candidate was asked to explain why he, personally, would be affected if same-sex marriages were legalized, and how his opposition squared with his long riff about the rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

The meeting ended with Santorum getting booed by much of the crowd in Concord, which included many college and high-school students, after suggesting that children raised by same-sex parents are being “harmed.”

“How does it affect you personally if two men or two women get married?” Santorum was asked at the College Convention 2012, to broad applause and cheers.

Santorum said that basic rights taken for granted by married people, such as the ability to visit their loved one in the hospital and make medical decisions on their behalf – can also be arranged for same-sex couples. “That can be done legally, through contract.”

The former U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, who is coming off a surprise near-victory in this week’s Iowa caucuses, then pivoted, and went on to equate same-sex marriages to multiple marriages.

“What about three men?” he said, as jeers rang out. “If you think it’s okay for two, you have to differentiate for me why you’re not okay with three. Any two people, or any three, or four.”

“He was comparing same-sex marriage to polygamy. I find that very insulting. We asked about two consenting adults,” said Tyrone Davis, 18, who was attending the College Convention 2012 in Concord from his home in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. “I don’t support Santorum at all. It seems he’s trying to create a theocracy.”

Santorum went on to say that marriages that produce children should have “privileged status,” which might be news even to straight, childless couples.

“Marriage is the union of a man and a woman. God made men and women. Men and women come together in a union to have children. It should be valued and have privileged status over people who want to have a relationship together. The uniqueness of marriage is it provides an intrinsic good to society. It’s the union that causes children to be born and raised in an environment that’s a birthright.”

“When we deny children that birthright by saying other types of relationships are okay – I think we are harming children,” Santorum said.

The College Convention is a once-every-four-year event that gathers college and high school students from across the nation to discuss the political climate.

Rhiannon Pyle, 17, of Newburyport, Massachusetts, asked Santorum the question about how his same-sex marriage opposition squared with support of constitutional rights for all. “We don’t see same sex marriage as a big deal,” the high school student said. “I’m sure it’s not going to be the first issue for a lot of people.”

Gay marriage has been legal in New Hampshire since 2010. Santorum was asked if, should he become president, he would uphold state laws on issues such as that and the legality of medical marijuana. “I don’t believe that we can have 50 definitions of marriage in this country,” he said.

He went on to draw a parallel between states being allowed to set policy on things like medical marijuana use and states being allowed to sterilize their citizens. “States have rights. But they don’t have the rights to do anything they want to.”

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